shop-now

inf-adinf-ad
Home / Education / Rising Interest in Higher Education in American Women
Rising Interest in Higher Education in American Women Print E-mail

Friday, 06 January 2012 00:00

Written by Uma Desu

While the argument that declining financial and healthcare jobs, the traditional mainstay of women in the workforce is making women move to college is not substantiated, it certainly can be one of the reasons.  

Pew Research center analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and found that from June 2009- May 2011, the recession years, men gained 768,000 jobs while women lost 218,000 jobs during that same time.

New York Times opined that this is the first time in the past 30 years that more young women are attending college than being in the workforce.  These statistics are confirmed by a recent USA Today report which stated that the retail sector offered employment to 216000 jobs in the previous 12 months whereas only 9000 women got jobs in the previous 12 months.  This has resulted in women’s share of the workforce dropping from 50% to 49.4%.  Most of the retail jobs are without benefits and are traditionally done by women.  Severe unemployment has led to men competing with women for those jobs as well. 

Statistics also show that more seniors are entering the workforce.  All the above shows that men are willing to take whatever job they can get hold of and hence are willing to work at lower wages and hence are grabbing most jobs.  This has left women in the workforce with no choice but to upgrade their skill-sets by choosing Higher Education. 

Other news shows that community colleges haven’t registered much growth in 2011 over 2010 but still the figures are much higher than in 2007.  California community colleges alone accounted for 25% of nations’ community colleges.  Statistics show though increasing growth in 2 year colleges.  This overall shows that new entrants are preferring to just upgrade their skills through 2 year courses rather than going for 4 year courses. 
 

Add your comment

Please register or login to add your comments to this article.

Back to top

 

Immigration 

 

podcasts